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Siemens to Develop Life-Saving Combat Ultrasound Hemorrhage Device
 

Following a competitive initial development process, Siemens Healthcare announced that the company has entered into an exclusive government contract with the Defense Advance Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop a prototype Deep Bleeder Acoustic Coagulation cuff (DBAC)*, a life-saving ultrasound device limiting blood loss and shock resulting from combat limb injuries.

The cuff is designed to limit blood loss from penetrating wounds to limbs in fast and slow bleeders, significantly reducing the risk of limb loss and death resulting from irreversible hemorrhagic shock. Once applied to the limb, Siemens Silicon Ultrasound technology within the cuff automatically detects the location and severity of the bleeding. This triggers therapeutic ultrasound elements within the cuff to emit and focus high-power energy toward the bleeding sites, speeding coagulation and halting bleeding. The device is intended for use by minimally-trained operators, curtailing bleeding in a minimal amount of time with automatic treatment and power shut-off.

Partners at the University of Washington’s Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound (UW), the Texas A&M University’s Institute for Preclinical Studies (TIPS) and Siemens Corporate Research (SCR) will work together with Siemens Healthcare to achieve DARPA’s goal of producing a prototype device in 18 months.


* Not commercially available in the United States.

Read Siemens’ Press Release here: http://www.medical.siemens.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/PressReleaseView~q_catalogId~e_-1~a_catTree~e_100011,13839~a_langId~e_-1~a_pageId~e_106945~a_storeId~e_10001.htm 

Read more about research being done to address combat casualties including achieving hemostasis https://www.usaccc.org/research/Hemostasis.jsp