Search :     
Articles » Skeletal » Radial ray aplasia
 2013-01-06-10 Radial aplasia, 12-21 weeks © Fabrice Cuillier www.TheFetus.net

Radial aplasia, bilateral, 12-21 weeks

Fabrice Cuillier, MD; D. Mardamootoo, MD.

Department of Gynecology, Félix Guyon’Hospital, 97400 Saint-Denis, Ile de la Réunion, France.


Case report

A 17-year-old woman (G1P0) was referred to our antenatal unit at 12 weeks of pregnancy. Her medical history was unremarkable. Ultrasound examination found short forearms with absent radius of the fetus (Images 1, 2).

The patient was scanned again at 14 weeks and the findings were confirmed (Images 3, 4). Besides, an amniotic band attached to fetal hand, was noted (Image 3).

Later scans were performed at 17 and 21 weeks with similar findings. We also noted hyperechoic kidneys with normal amount of amniotic fluid at 21st week.

The newborn was delivered at term. No amniotic band was found, but the bilateral radial aplasia was confirmed. Newborn's blood count was normal.

Images 1, 2: 12 weeks of pregnancy; the images show radial deviation of the fetal hands with missing radius of the forearm due to radial aplasia.

 

Images 3, 4: 14 weeks of pregnancy; the image 3 shows amniotic band attached to fetal hand; the image 4 shows radial deviation of left fetal hand due to radial aplasia.

 

Images 5, 6: 17 weeks of pregnancy; the images show radial deviation of fetal hands caused by the radial aplasia.

 

Images 7, 8: 19 weeks of pregnancy; the images show radial deviation of fetal hands caused by the radial aplasia.

 

Images 9, 10: 21 weeks of pregnancy; the images show radial deviation of fetal hands caused by the radial aplasia.

 

Images 11, 12: 21 weeks of pregnancy; the images show normal fetal heart (Image 11) and hyperechoic kidneys (Image 12) of the fetus.

 

Image 13: Postnatal radiogram of the newborn confirming bilateral radial aplasia.

Help Support TheFetus.net :