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2014-02-08-10 Transposition of the great arteries, ventricular septal defect, and interruption of the aortic arch © Cuillier www.TheFetus.net

Transposition of the great arteries, ventricular septal defect, and interruption of the aortic arch 

Department of Gynecology, Felix Guyon Hospital, Saint-Denis, Reunion, France.


Case report

A 40-year-old woman (G5P4), was referred to our antenatal unit at 22 weeks of gestation because of suspected fetal cardiac anomaly. There was no known family history of congenital diseases. The patient did not take any medications.

Our ultrasonographic examination revealed:

- ventricular septal defect;
- transposition of the great arteries;
- suspicion of the interruption of the aortic arch.

Fetal karyotype was normal. The mother was transferred to Paris at 35 weeks of gestation. Postnatally all the above mentioned findings had been confirmed and the newborn underwent surgery.

Images 1, 2, 3: The images show transverse scan of the thorax at the level of the four chamber view of the heart. Ventricular septal defect can be seen.

 

 

Images 4-11: The images show parallel course of the great arteries - transposed thinner aorta arising from the right ventricle and transposed wider pulmonary artery arising from the left ventricle.

 

 

 

 

Videos 1, 2, 3, 4: The videos show all the anomalies described above: transverse scan of the thorax at the level of the four chamber view of the heart shows ventricular septal defect; parallel course of the great arteries (thinner aorta and wider pulmonary artery); videos 3 and 4 show straight course of the thin aorta that divides into branches posteriorly and do not connect to the descending part of the aorta - interruption of the aortic arch.

 

 


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